Prince of Malorn, third book in the Annals of Alasia

Prince of Malorn, third book in the Annals of Alasia

Prince of Malorn

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Book Description:

 One major obstacle stands between seventeen-year-old Prince Korram and the throne that is his birthright: Regent Rampus.  Temporary ruler of Malorn, Rampus has no intention of giving up his position when the crown prince comes of age – or of allowing the prince to live long enough to reach that age.

Desperate to build an army of his own to stand against the regent, Korram treks into the Impassable Mountains to try to recruit the one segment of Malornian society not under Rampus’s control.  But can he lead a band of untrained hunters and gatherers to victory against the full might of the Malornian military?  Or will they all be crushed by the grasping hand of the regent before the prince can claim his rightful throne?

Q: This is the third book in the Annals of Alasia.  What makes this trilogy unique?

A: The books don’t take place one after the other; instead, their time frames overlap.  They each describe the same major political event: the invasion of the kingdom of Alasia by the neighboring kingdom of Malorn. Prince of Alasia begins on the night of the Invasion and describes what happens to twelve-year-old Prince Jaymin after he is forced to flee for his life.  In the Enemy’s Service tells the story of those who were not able to escape from the Alasian palace when the enemy invaded.  Prince of Malorn begins several months earlier and focuses on the Malornian perspective of the events leading up to the Invasion.  In each of the books, main characters from the others make brief appearances and interact with each other at the point where the time frames and settings overlap.

Q: Do you recommend that readers start with your first two books before reading Prince of Malorn?

A: Not necessarily.  The books can be read in any order, and each one can stand on its own.  But each of the three fills in gaps in the others’ stories, and their different perspectives on the same events and characters will make for a richer reading experience overall.

Q: Will there be more books in the Annals of Alasia?

A: Definitely! I’m nearly done with the fourth book, tentatively titled King of Malorn. It takes place five years later and brings together the main characters from all three books in the original trilogy. There may eventually be other books in the series too; I have lots of ideas!

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For more information about Prince of Malorn (a map of the fantasy world, “interviews” with some of the characters, and an exciting scene from the story!) visit my blog at http://anniedouglasslima.blogspot.tw/p/prince-of-malorn.html.

Annie Douglass LimaAnnie Douglass Lima spent most of her childhood in Kenya and later graduated from Biola University in Southern California. She and her husband Floyd currently live in Taiwan, where she teaches fifth grade at Morrison Academy. She has been writing poetry, short stories, and novels since her childhood, and to date has published six books (three YA action adventure/fantasy and three anthologies of her students’ poetry). Besides writing, her hobbies include reading (especially fantasy and science fiction), scrapbooking, and international travel. View all her books at http://bit.ly/AnnieDouglassLimaOnAmazon.

Mercy!

Mercy!

“Blessed are the merciful,
for they shall obtain mercy.”
Matt. 5:7 NKJV

The above verse is the next statement in the beatitudes Jesus spoke in the Sermon on the Mount.

The dictionary defines mercy as compassion, pity, benevolence, acts of kindness or favor, kindly forbearance shown toward an offender, an enemy, or other person in one’s power, or something that gives evidence of divine favor, blessing.

Vine’s says the Greek word for merciful means “not simply possessed of pity but actively compassionate, is used of Christ as a High Priest, Heb 2:17, and of those who are like God, Matt 5:7.”

To obtain mercy means to compassionate (by word or deed, specially, by divine grace), to have mercy on, to succor the afflicted, to bring help to the wretched, to show kindness, by beneficence, or assistance, to feel sympathy with the misery of another, and especially sympathy manifested in act.

Who comes to mind of a modern-day servant of compassion? Mother Teresa! She has been dubbed “an angel of mercy.” She said, “Being unwanted, unloved, uncared for, forgotten by everybody, I think that is a much greater hunger, a much greater poverty than the person who has nothing to eat.”

And what did she do? She desperately and consistently tried to fill those needs. Her active mercy-compassion knew no bounds.

Who was her example? Jesus. Scripture says, “But when He saw the multitudes, He was moved with compassion for them.” (Matt. 9:36 NKJV) Several other times, scripture says Jesus was filled with compassion for an individual.

As we are to follow Jesus’ example, we can apply to ourselves what Jesus said to Peter in a parable, “Should you not also have had compassion on your fellow servant, just as I had pity on you?” (Matt. 18:33 NKJV)

Are we touched with compassion for others? Are we actively seeking to be compassionate to all those that cross our paths? Do we go out of our way to be God’s hands of mercy kindness, sympathy, and assistance to one suffering in life? Sure, we may do so for family, friends, or even for some strangers.

But what about our enemies, those who offend us? Hmmm, another matter, isn’t it?

“Finally, all of you be of one mind, having compassion for one another; love as brothers, be tenderhearted, be courteous; not returning evil for evil or reviling for reviling, but on the contrary blessing, knowing that you were called to this, that you may inherit a blessing.” (1 Peter 3:8-9 NKJV)

William Shakespeare wrote…

“The quality of mercy is not strain’d;
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest:
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes.”

In need of mercy? Reach out to another. As the verse says, those who are merciful will receive mercy’s compassion.

May you and another be blessed as you spread mercy and compassion today!

 

LynnMosher website 4

At a time of physical upheaval in 2000, Lynn Mosher felt led of the Lord to take up her pen and write. With this new passion, she has embraced her mission to reach others through Christ-honoring literature, encouraging them in their walk and offering comfort through the written word. Lynn lives with her hubby (since 1966) in their Kentucky nest, emptied of three chicklets, and expanded by three giggly grand-chicklets, and an inherited dog. You can find out more about Lynn by visiting her website, Heading Home.

Thank You, God, for My Friends

Lord, you have created us human beings with a social nature, and human interdependence is of Your design.  Teach us that we humans cannot become all that we can be without other people, for it is in association with others what we can reach the height of our potential.